Weird Life

Helga Katrina Sinclair

(Source: foxyfoxy, via mindwithteeth)

maarnayeri:

Let us be vividly clear about this.

What the New York Times did to Michael Brown today was not merely slander. It wasn’t a case of a lack of journalistic integrity.

Highlighting that a black teenager was “no angel” on the day he is being laid to rest after being hunted and killed by racist vigilante forces is not an unfortunate coincidence.

The New York Times deliberately played into an archaic American tradition in devaluing both the merit of black life and the tragedy of black death.

They chose the day of his funeral, as his family, friends and activists everywhere have to grapple with a human being lost to pontificate about how he was “no angel”. Michael Brown was many things to many people; a son, a brother, a cousin, a nephew and another black causality of murderous police institutions and today, amidst all the racist violence he, his loved ones and community have had to endure, he was going to finally receive the respect and moment of honor he deserved and NYT decided today, of all days, to tune in their audience onto wholly irrelevant facts about his life - that in turn, transform the very injustice surrounding his death and the following police violence that plagued Ferguson into a national panel about whether or not his death is actually worth mourning and their language suggested that to them, it indeed is not.

This was hardly an accident or mistake. This is the perpetual hostility that is met against black life in America. The consensus is that black people deserve no respect and for black life to be legitimized and honored, we must meet a list of prerequisites. Subsequently, if black people aren’t valued, neither are our deaths understood as tragic or murders seen as criminal action.

This has been the atmosphere of America since its inception and much has not improved.

(via femmeshepard)

suicidal-broken-and-hurt:

hatinngthis:

If you’ve been:

        - physically abused

        - verbally abused

        - depressed

        - unbelievably stressed

        - had your heart broken

       - dealing/dealt with your parents separating

       - hiding stuff from friends/family cause you’re scared of being judged

       - judged for something you can’t help

       - self harmed

….Then reblog this to show people what reality is like for you.

8 of these things has happen to me that’s sad

All of the above. This is not my reality. This is just some shit that happened in the course of living my life. This is not my reality. My reality is so much more than this list.

(via meitanteishin-chan)

mandicreally:

mr-leach:

I am a pretty patient person but if there is one thing I will lose my shit over almost instantly it’s my computer/internet being slow my tolerance level is exactly 0 for that shit man I did my time in the 90’s/2000’s I don’t need any of this garbage

"I did my time" damn straight

(Source: cressescrest, via fallintolight)

eon-dream:

I don’t think Pythius takes to kindly to baby toothless… 

My favorite picture is the last one :3

(via fallintolight)

t-ardigrades:

wigmund:

pinkrocksugar:

stunningpicture:

LOOK AT ITS BIG FOOTERS

IMAGINE THE TOE BEANS ON THIS BABBY

(main image source)
Lynx footsies are mostly floof


He can’t have too much bean, he lives in the chilly zone. He’ll get cold beanies and that’s no good.

t-ardigrades:

wigmund:

pinkrocksugar:

stunningpicture:

LOOK AT ITS BIG FOOTERS

IMAGINE THE TOE BEANS ON THIS BABBY

(main image source)

Lynx footsies are mostly floof

image

He can’t have too much bean, he lives in the chilly zone. He’ll get cold beanies and that’s no good.

(via fallintolight)

roachpatrol:

muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow:

ok lemme tell you a thing about raccoons

I adore that all these raccoons are like “I respect that you don’t want me to take this, but I’m taking this.”

(via fallintolight)

oopsakink:

The fact that this lovely OP felt obliged to tag this post with “thick thighs” and “chubby girls” pretty accurately sums up everything that is wrong with this world. Darling, Hugh Hefner called from 1960, he’d like you to appear in Playboy (back before it went entirely plastic).

(Source: fuccthedeville)

natsulasommer:

prettyinpwn:

natsulasommer:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

factsbrain:

Like all living things, humans are bio­luminescent (meaning we glow) – We glow brightest during the afternoon. - weird, interesting & funny facts

what

i’ve been staring at this for like 5 minutes. so.. what. i don’t think people glow. but this is telling me that we actually emit visible light.. especially in the afternoon?? am i reading this right or what

"all living things" plants. when do the plants glow

science side of tumblr pls

I’m not from the science side of tumblr, but here’s the answer anyways:
 Basically, all living things are bioluminescent because every living thing has chemical reactions occurring in their cells. The energy created from these chemical reactions physically manifests as light, thus… all living things naturally glow.
 However, this glow cannot be seen by the human eye. In fact, the only way they’ve ever captured this light is through special cameras. Using these ultra special cameras, they’ve imaged subjects’ bodies over 24 hour periods. It has been found out that humans emit the most of this glow during the afternoon (about 4 PM), it is the weakest in the morning (about 10 AM), and the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, neck, and forehead.
The light is about a thousand times weaker than what humans can perceive.
 Basically, it’s a side effect of metabolic reactions. It’s been suspected that humans are bioluminescent for years, but they weren’t able to confirm it until recently thanks to technology and a man named Masaki Kobayashi from the Tohoku Institute of Technology.
 Sources:
http://scienceblogs.com/notrocketscience/2009/07/20/photographing-the-glow-of-the-human-body/
http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2009/jul/17/human-bioluminescence
http://www.livescience.com/7799-strange-humans-glow-visible-light.html

10/10 explaination
10/10 source
10/10 time to answer
overal 10/10
you are now offiicially from the science side of tumblr.
and thank you

natsulasommer:

prettyinpwn:

natsulasommer:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

factsbrain:

Like all living things, humans are bio­luminescent (meaning we glow) – We glow brightest during the afternoon. weirdinteresting & funny facts

what

i’ve been staring at this for like 5 minutes. so.. what. i don’t think people glow. but this is telling me that we actually emit visible light.. especially in the afternoon?? am i reading this right or what

"all living things" plants. when do the plants glow

science side of tumblr pls

I’m not from the science side of tumblr, but here’s the answer anyways:

 Basically, all living things are bioluminescent because every living thing has chemical reactions occurring in their cells. The energy created from these chemical reactions physically manifests as light, thus… all living things naturally glow.

 However, this glow cannot be seen by the human eye. In fact, the only way they’ve ever captured this light is through special cameras. Using these ultra special cameras, they’ve imaged subjects’ bodies over 24 hour periods. It has been found out that humans emit the most of this glow during the afternoon (about 4 PM), it is the weakest in the morning (about 10 AM), and the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, neck, and forehead.

The light is about a thousand times weaker than what humans can perceive.

 Basically, it’s a side effect of metabolic reactions. It’s been suspected that humans are bioluminescent for years, but they weren’t able to confirm it until recently thanks to technology and a man named Masaki Kobayashi from the Tohoku Institute of Technology.

 Sources:

http://scienceblogs.com/notrocketscience/2009/07/20/photographing-the-glow-of-the-human-body/

http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2009/jul/17/human-bioluminescence

http://www.livescience.com/7799-strange-humans-glow-visible-light.html

10/10 explaination

10/10 source

10/10 time to answer

overal 10/10

you are now offiicially from the science side of tumblr.

and thank you

(via meitanteishin-chan)

sue-78:

Benedict Cumberbatch’s #IceBucketChallenge for #MND

Benedict Cumberbatch wet t-shirt eye candy for charity

(via fallintolight)

chrissyirish13:

onlyblackbeauty:

annieskywalker:

amaditalks:

3rockstarproblem:

lifehackable:

More (x)

I’m almost done with EMT school, and I can verify this 100%. We don’t give a shit what you’ve taken or how illegal it may be. We want to know what and how much so we can save your ass. Unless its directly related to a crime scene in some way, we don’t tell. 

It makes me enraged and also deeply saddened that the police state has become so entwined with every aspect of our lives that people are afraid to tell the truth to people trying to render them with emergency care. We’ve broken ourselves.

Boost because everyone should know!!!

My uncle was an EMT and I can verify this is true.

It’s a hundred percent true the only time police will be involved Is if you have endangered the lives of another adult or child. Until that happens you will not get in trouble, your life means more to a doctor than the mistakes you made to put yourself in that position

chrissyirish13:

onlyblackbeauty:

annieskywalker:

amaditalks:

3rockstarproblem:

lifehackable:

More (x)

I’m almost done with EMT school, and I can verify this 100%. We don’t give a shit what you’ve taken or how illegal it may be. We want to know what and how much so we can save your ass. Unless its directly related to a crime scene in some way, we don’t tell. 

It makes me enraged and also deeply saddened that the police state has become so entwined with every aspect of our lives that people are afraid to tell the truth to people trying to render them with emergency care. We’ve broken ourselves.

Boost because everyone should know!!!

My uncle was an EMT and I can verify this is true.

It’s a hundred percent true the only time police will be involved Is if you have endangered the lives of another adult or child. Until that happens you will not get in trouble, your life means more to a doctor than the mistakes you made to put yourself in that position

(via femmeshepard)

deanplease:

whitmerule:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

Absolutely.I’ve considered myself to be on the spectrum for years - Asperger’s - not using it as an excuse, but as a way to identify symptoms and strengths and weaknesses and think about better ways to care for myself and avoid (or manage) awkward situations. A few months ago, for the first time, I had an in-depth meeting with at therapist, and after the third session she told me that she’d been figuring me for Asperger’s after about ten minutes into the first session - only of course, we don’t call it Asperger’s anymore, it doesn’t ‘exist’. :P But whether we want to class it as a condition or not, that’s the way my mind works.Now, I can cope with most aspects of everyday life. I’m good at pretending. I’m just very, very lonely, because I can’t adapt quickly, and most of my learned practices involve closing down the conversation politely and pleasantly and moving on, which is not conducive to, you know, building relationships. But the point is, this sort of thing would absolutely help anybody like me - or anybody with greater or lesser degrees of social anxiety or similar - just to feel that little bit safer manoeuvring through everyday life. If, you know, they were widely accepted and not stigmatised. Which… okay, not likely, but we could at least start with places like cons that already have a sort of mutually informed community going on.

A lovely invention.
And Sam Thomas laid that shit down and dropped the mic. 

deanplease:

whitmerule:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

Absolutely.

I’ve considered myself to be on the spectrum for years - Asperger’s - not using it as an excuse, but as a way to identify symptoms and strengths and weaknesses and think about better ways to care for myself and avoid (or manage) awkward situations. A few months ago, for the first time, I had an in-depth meeting with at therapist, and after the third session she told me that she’d been figuring me for Asperger’s after about ten minutes into the first session - only of course, we don’t call it Asperger’s anymore, it doesn’t ‘exist’. :P But whether we want to class it as a condition or not, that’s the way my mind works.

Now, I can cope with most aspects of everyday life. I’m good at pretending. I’m just very, very lonely, because I can’t adapt quickly, and most of my learned practices involve closing down the conversation politely and pleasantly and moving on, which is not conducive to, you know, building relationships. But the point is, this sort of thing would absolutely help anybody like me - or anybody with greater or lesser degrees of social anxiety or similar - just to feel that little bit safer manoeuvring through everyday life. If, you know, they were widely accepted and not stigmatised. Which… okay, not likely, but we could at least start with places like cons that already have a sort of mutually informed community going on.

A lovely invention.

And Sam Thomas laid that shit down and dropped the mic. 

(via fluffixation)